The Rabbit’s Watch

1 11 2009

*Summary: Time is a thing often contemplated and often used for imagery. This is a short analysis of the topic of time in chapter 1 of The Annotated Alice.

Often time is seen as an ungraspable conundrum of diction assembled in a disparate way to symbolize whatever the author is attempting to convey. Pretty much, people are confused a lot by the concept of time, because the writers that address it best often seem to hide their ideas behind big words and odd tangents.

Let me define time: “the indefinite continued progress of existence and events in the past, present, and future regarded as a whole” say the Oxford American Dictionaries. Time’s passing is something we worry about daily. We worry, wondering if we have finished enough work. We worry, wondering if we have slept enough. We worry, wondering if we have eaten enough. We worry, wondering if we have accomplished everything we needed to today, last week, last year, and in all of our life. It always seems that we never feel accomplished when we worry if we did enough.

In The Annotated Alice I find that Carroll toys around with time to suit his storytelling needs, but what other meaning, what adult meaning, can we find enveloped in the text? The Rabbit, bearing his fancy coat and pocketwatch rushes along paying no heed to Alice, worrying if he will be late. Connecting this to us, do we often rush along in life working and worrying? In turn, are we missing out on the beauty and joy to be in found in something so innocent as children, as Alice? As Alice falls down the seemingly never-ending Rabbit Hole, she reacts innocently to her situation, using the fall as an opportunity to think upon expansive tangents. At the same time, she bears no concern for her safety, even though she has fallen for several minutes (and accelerated to an incredible speed). T

hinking in terms of humanity, can we be easily distracted from dreams and the present by fear? Do we lack Alice’s innocence and are we thereby concerned with the end point of the fall instead of enjoying our journey?

Ideas and analysis welcome 🙂


Actions

Information

3 responses

31 12 2009
Neil Winton

I’ll 2nd your points, Mr Long. I always advise my pupils to avoid ‘over-writing’ which is always a danger when trying to impress.

That said, there is the definite grain of some good ideas here. I’m looking forward to seeing how they develop…

5 11 2009
Connor M.

Some interesting points that lead to one of those oh-so-great questions of life. We as humanity may be more concerned with “the end point of the fall instead of enjoying our (Hero’s) journey.”

It was a rather quick scene to draw so much from, but I’m sure the rest of the story is riddled (both metaphorically and literally) with countless references to humanity, psycoligy, and philosophy… or are we over-analyzing once again?

A great entry, and I concur on the part of fear distracting from dreams and the pesent. That fact is very clear in this portion of the story, as we discover a little later on.

3 11 2009
Christian Long

In spite of the heady effort the reader must undertake to ascend the spire of your language play, I rather like this line of yours: “Often time is seen as an ungraspable conundrum of diction assembled in a disparate way to symbolize whatever the author is attempting to convey.” Could it be [cough] that the very blogger writing that is employing the same analytical chicanery to advance the ramparts of his ensconced point? [wink]

On another note entirely, I quite appreciate how you ended your entry. Great questions:

“Thinking in terms of humanity, can we be easily distracted from dreams and the present by fear? Do we lack Alice’s innocence and are we thereby concerned with the end point of the fall instead of enjoying our journey?”

I think you’re onto something!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: